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Replacing heparin with saline to prevent complications in long term central venous catheters in children

Posted by Natalie K. Bradford, Rachel M. Edwards and Raymond J. Chan on 23 November 2015
Background

A central venous catheter (CVC) is a long, thin, flexible tube which is inserted into a large central vein. This enables access to the blood stream for people with serious medical conditions to receive medications and fluids, as well as the collection of blood specimens. Long term central venous catheters are used to access the blood system in children with complex medical conditions like cancer. To stop the catheter from becoming blocked it is usual to use heparin, a drug that prevents clots forming, to flush the catheter. However, some studies have shown that heparin is not necessary, and that normal saline (a sterile salt water solution) can be safely used instead. Heparin may be associated with complications, such as bleeding and infection, along with higher costs for health care providers. While the complications such as infections and occlusions are uncommon, practices vary around the world and there are many inconsistencies regarding the best flush solution to use to prevent complications in long term catheters.

Read more: https://www.cochrane.org/CD010996/PVD_replacing-heparin-saline-prevent-complications-long-term-central-venous-catheters-children

Author: Natalie K. Bradford, Rachel M. Edwards and Raymond J. Chan
Tags: Publications 2016 Publications

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